Our poetry is personal to us. It’s a leap in itself to open the secretive pages of our journals and read our most intimate thoughts aloud to others at club. That leap, however daunting, has been initiated! We’ve spent time together at Epeolatry, and we’ve grown together in our knowledge and understanding of poetry. Now, it is time to take the next step.
What does it take to publish a poem? What forms should our poems take? What length is most desirable? At July’s Epeolatry tomorrow, July 27 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the library, we’ll discuss current trends in published poetry, what publishers are looking for, sharpen our current works, and consider the potential of our own self-published poetry journal. Join us!

Our poetry is personal to us. It’s a leap in itself to open the secretive pages of our journals and read our most intimate thoughts aloud to others at club. That leap, however daunting, has been initiated! We’ve spent time together at Epeolatry, and we’ve grown together in our knowledge and understanding of poetry. Now, it is time to take the next step.

What does it take to publish a poem? What forms should our poems take? What length is most desirable? At July’s Epeolatry tomorrow, July 27 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the library, we’ll discuss current trends in published poetry, what publishers are looking for, sharpen our current works, and consider the potential of our own self-published poetry journal. Join us!


THE NIGHT by Wolfe Gray

Daylight people rant and rave

They live life on the run

Slave and sweat all day long

And burn beneath the sun

I pity those who slave

With no thought of eternity

Yet after the day’s pain is done

The night belongs to me

Some day midnight is coming

Smooth as silk for me

Moon’s dark side is heaven

For the night belongs to me

I hear her voice in the darkness

The shadow beneath the moon

Milady will come for me at midnight

Lest the dawn should come too soon

We will dance beneath the moonlight

We will make love under the stars

We will play among the planets

Kiss Jupiter, Venus and Mars

Someday midnight is coming

Anticipated eagerly

Dark side of the moon is heaven

For the night,

Yes the night belongs to me.


Where are the songs of Spring? Aye, where are they?

John Keats, To Autumn (23)

Today we will read John Keats’ To Autumn, along with Elizabeth Bishop’s The Bight (On My Birthday)  for a study of imagery. We will also discuss what ‘darkness’ means to each of us, and how we can use our perspective of darkness in our art as poets. 

Q
How can 'delivery' affect my understanding of a particular Poem?
Anonymous
A

Delivery can strongly affect a person’s understanding of a particular poem. The reader’s tone greatly shapes the feeling behind each word. Pauses add emphasis when necessary. Eye contact at specific moments, while withheld at others, can also impact the audience’s understanding of the poem. Even the posture of the reader can create a specific mood.

Before reading a poem to an audience, the speaker should first get to know the poem. Just as you would do research prior to delivering a speech, the reader needs to understand the poem before sharing it aloud with others, lest he/she not give it the tone, pauses and mood most appropriate. If it is a poem you have written, consider what you felt at the time it was authored, and consider what mood and emotions you want to get across to the audience. If the poem to be read is that of someone else, research the author to determine what he/she may have felt/meant at the time the poem was authored so that his/her justice can be done with your reading.

Once you feel comfortable with the poem’s meaning and feeling, consider how you can best deliver it with that tone and mood in mind. Vary your pitch and volume at parts that call for it. Pause to place emphasis on certain sentences or phrases. The poem does NOT have to be read line-for-line the way it is written. YOU choose how you believe it will best be understood by the audience. Feel free to act it out as much as you would like, to read to an imaginary person beside you if it is addressed to someone specific, to use gestures, to yell, to scream, to laugh. Be creative. Don’t hesitate to do whatever you think will best represent the mood and feeling of the poem. 


SCARS [by Wolfe Gray]

My eyes have tears

That dare not flow

Scars have I

That do not show

A heart I have

That I don’t fully know

My mind has chambers,

I dare not go.

Left with all the marks

Of a wounded soul


ODE TO A BROKEN HEART [by Wolfe Gray]

Her whole life has been naught

But the history of her affections

Her soul’s purpose and only thought

Her world entire, her mind’s empire

          Has been her heart

The hidden treasures she has sought

Are love’s objects of desire

She sent forth her attentions

On vain adventures they depart

Yet in disappointment’s webs are caught

Her cause, scorched and burnt in passion’s fires

Her sympathies are left bankrupt

Dreams laid waste, her hopes expire

It was a shipwreck of the heart


“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before…” - Edgar Allan Poe

Saturday, we commemorate Poe at Epeolatry Club - 3 to 5 at the library.
Come with your own work and any EAP books you’ve got to share, too :-)

“Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there, wondering, fearing, doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before…” - Edgar Allan Poe

Saturday, we commemorate Poe at Epeolatry Club - 3 to 5 at the library.

Come with your own work and any EAP books you’ve got to share, too :-)


Guys! Check it out! I found this treasure at Half Price Books last weekend in Fort Wayne and, of course, had to get it. It was, after all, half the original price. This beauty has pages upon pages of poetry from the greatest poets, as well as brief biographies of each. What’s more, CDs included record each poet reading aloud a few of his/her own works. I was so excited to show you this awesome addition to our club, and am looking forward to digging into it with you at future meetings. 
Unfortunately, Edgar Allan Poe is not among the poets featured in this book, so Wolfe will be on his own this month. Wolfe will be leading us in a discussion of EAP at our February meeting, which will take place this coming Saturday, Feb. 23rd at the Huntington County Library. Meet us from 3 to 5 p.m. in front of the fireplace, the usual spot, to learn more about this great poet and share your own poetry, if you so desire.
Last month, we were given the assignment to write either a haiku, idyl or free verse poem with the integration of some form of one or more of the following words/phrases: cultivate, the machine, mind(s) is/are changing, schools of thought, theory, nothing is sacred.  I have been working on my contribution, and it has been a tough go, but I hope to share at least a little something with you come Saturday. I hope to hear some of your progress, as well!

Guys! Check it out! I found this treasure at Half Price Books last weekend in Fort Wayne and, of course, had to get it. It was, after all, half the original price. This beauty has pages upon pages of poetry from the greatest poets, as well as brief biographies of each. What’s more, CDs included record each poet reading aloud a few of his/her own works. I was so excited to show you this awesome addition to our club, and am looking forward to digging into it with you at future meetings. 

Unfortunately, Edgar Allan Poe is not among the poets featured in this book, so Wolfe will be on his own this month. Wolfe will be leading us in a discussion of EAP at our February meeting, which will take place this coming Saturday, Feb. 23rd at the Huntington County Library. Meet us from 3 to 5 p.m. in front of the fireplace, the usual spot, to learn more about this great poet and share your own poetry, if you so desire.

Last month, we were given the assignment to write either a haiku, idyl or free verse poem with the integration of some form of one or more of the following words/phrases: cultivate, the machine, mind(s) is/are changing, schools of thought, theory, nothing is sacred.  I have been working on my contribution, and it has been a tough go, but I hope to share at least a little something with you come Saturday. I hope to hear some of your progress, as well!


I logged into Facebook after Poetry Club and this is what I saw:

I’m grateful for being here, for being able to think, for being able to see, for being able to taste, for appreciating love – for knowing that it exists in a world so rife with vulgarity, with brutality and violence, and yet love exists. I’m grateful to know that it exists.

 

Maya expresses, here, what I felt after this month’s meeting today. I am grateful, too, for expression of thought and the creative process and all the many wonderful ideas and opinions you all express and share during our meetings. Thank you for another great experience, and for inspiration!

 

-Carrie


Are you going to make the rest of your life the best of your life?
Here we are in yet another new year, already almost one month gone. Did you make resolutions for 2013? Whether you did or didn’t, whether you’ve stuck with them so far or not, think about your goals (life, career, poetic or otherwise). What would you like to accomplish this year? In the next 5 years? The next 10? 
Even the most accomplished poets began just like you or me, like any “plain” Jane or John Doe on the street. At this month’s Epeolatry Club, moved to a new meeting time of 3 to 5 p.m. every fourth Saturday (that’s this Saturday, Jan. 26 for this month!) in front of the fireplace at the library, we’ll talk about Ms. Sylvia Plath and her most humble beginnings - her fears, concerns, doubts, trials and errors, and eventual successes. I think you’ll be comforted to know that Sylvia, too, suffered from failures, regrets, disappointments…and she was harder on her own writing than you are, I’m sure of it. She was afraid she’d fail, waste her life away…but she was determined NOT to let that happen. What are you determined to accomplish?

Come ready to discuss your goals, hear about Sylvia’s struggles and read her successes with free verse, as well as the art of the Haiku and the Idyll. 

See you all on Saturday!

Are you going to make the rest of your life the best of your life?

Here we are in yet another new year, already almost one month gone. Did you make resolutions for 2013? Whether you did or didn’t, whether you’ve stuck with them so far or not, think about your goals (life, career, poetic or otherwise). What would you like to accomplish this year? In the next 5 years? The next 10? 

Even the most accomplished poets began just like you or me, like any “plain” Jane or John Doe on the street. At this month’s Epeolatry Club, moved to a new meeting time of 3 to 5 p.m. every fourth Saturday (that’s this Saturday, Jan. 26 for this month!) in front of the fireplace at the library, we’ll talk about Ms. Sylvia Plath and her most humble beginnings - her fears, concerns, doubts, trials and errors, and eventual successes. I think you’ll be comforted to know that Sylvia, too, suffered from failures, regrets, disappointments…and she was harder on her own writing than you are, I’m sure of it. She was afraid she’d fail, waste her life away…but she was determined NOT to let that happen. What are you determined to accomplish?

Come ready to discuss your goals, hear about Sylvia’s struggles and read her successes with free verse, as well as the art of the Haiku and the Idyll. 

See you all on Saturday!

(via silent-chaos-deactivated2014070)